Do You Remember When…


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Perry Green would roll out Chief Waramaug, a life-sized papier mache and wooden horse on wheels, to the porch of Green Warehouse each morning and then back inside at the close of business each night? It became a ritual in the town and residents came to expect it. The horse stood on that porch for 70 years and became an icon in New Milford. With the close of the Green Warehouse (one of New Milford's oldest businesses) in 1987, Chief Warmaug was retired to greener pastures. He was donated to the Historical Society to be preserved and kept as a town landmark.

Chief Waramaug's origins have been traced to Peru Indiana, where he was manufactured by a firm that made display horses for shops around the country. Perry Green's grandfather, William Green (1836-1919) and his father, Sherman D. Green (1869-1950), bought the horse from a salesman named W. G. Cargill of Westfield, MA. In the early in the 1900's, the Greens had it shipped to New Milford from the Midwest for $125.00, which included charges for crating and shipping.

Chief Waramaug still stands proudly in the museum as a historical landmark today as promised… When people walk in and see him, he brings back a flood of memories and nostalgia from an earlier time. Recently, we had a visitor, Genevieve (Hallock) Nasturwich who is 89 years old, come to the museum just to see Chief Waramaug again. She had grown up in New Milford where her father, John Hallock was a tobacco farmer. She attended St. Francis School and would walk through town each day on her way home and stop to see the horse at Green's Warehouse. Perry Green would let her sit on the horse while he wheeled him inside for the night. She wasn't able to sit on the horse again, but he certainly brought a smile to her face!

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