The New Milford Historical Society and Museum announce that the museum will be closed to the public for tours during the months of January and February 2018. Along with the Curator and Registrar, a team of volunteers will be working on a collection storage rehabilitation project of the Main Gallery Attic. This project will include a major cleaning and re-organization of the museum’s primary collection storage area. Properly cleaning, cataloguing and re-housing the collection to create better access and to promote preservation of the collection according to professional curatorial standards is the goal.
Researchers can still make an appointment for access to our archives by calling the museum during regular business hours.

Our Collection

Gaylord’s District

the gaylordsville one room school house By 1740, the need for a school was felt by the colonists in northwestern New Milford, and so on their own they funded and built a one-room schoolhouse just south of Aaron Gaylord’s home. Ongoing expenses were divided among the families with children in the school. In 1860, the town formed the school districts and partially paid for expenses with collected tax monies. By 1858, the building was in poor condition, and the Gaylord School Committee decided to move it a short distance onto a new foundation and make the necessary repairs.
In 1872, the school was enlarged. In 1915, Miss Bessie Cornwell became the teacher following her father Charles Soule and remaining there until her retirement in1957, a total of 42 years. During her time, in 1952, electric lights were installed, an oil heater replaced the coal stove, and a small addition housed lavatories, doing away with the outside toilets.
In 1935, grades were limited to one through six, due to increased attendance caused by the closing of the Waller District School. As the populations grew, the higher grades were transferred to the centralized schools of New Milford. By 1967, only grades one and two were taught in the schoolhouse, and it closed its doors for the last time that June. In 1968, a group of Gaylordsville residents worked to preserve the schoolhouse as an historic site.
In 1975, the Gaylordsville Historical Society was formed and now maintains the building as a museum containing items of historic interest. The structure has been known as “The Little Red Schoolhouse” for many years. Contact the Gaylordsville Historical Society for information and hours.


To see more, click below to visit the individual schoolhouses…
Hill and Plain School District

Northville

Gaylord District


Information for this article was initially compiled by G. H. Waldrop as an informational brochure provided with the purchase of a pewter medallion ornament issued by the New Milford Historical Society. Some of the ornaments are available through the museum store.
Gaylord’s District text ©2008, The Gaylordsville Historical Society
Historical photos provided by the New Milford Historical Society.
Photos © 2006-2012, Diane Dubreuil and Rob Burkhart.
Download the brochure, here
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